Sweet and Spicy Candied Pistachios | What I Made on The Taste

Candied Pistachios | The TasteSweet. Spicy. Salty. Down-right addictive. Candied nuts are the perfect cocktail nibble or crunchy garnish and often appear in some form on my holiday menu. I generally use pecans and have a bowl out on the bar for people to munch while mixing a cocktail. (And usually add bourbon to the recipe, if we’re being honest.) Yet pistachios are smaller and, for this reason, the better complement to the dish I was preparing on the holiday challenge for The Taste. Stay tuned for that!

In the meantime, whatever nut you choose, I hope this treat becomes your next holiday favorite.

* * * * *

Ingredients

  • 2 cups pistachios, shelled, toasted
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1/4 teaspoon white pepper
  • Cayenne pepper, to taste
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons honey

Instructions

Toast pistachios at 350 degrees for about 8 minutes, until deepened in color and fragrant. (Alternatively, begin with unsalted and toasted pistachio nutmeats.) Mix together all spices in a small bowl. Taste. It should have a pleasant flavor (as good as dried spices can taste, that is). Adjust accordingly, keeping in mind that the spices will become diluted once they’re cooked. But also note that I love spicy food, and it definitely comes through in this recipe. If you don’t like heat, use less white pepper or omit it completely—and certainly don’t add cayenne. Toss the pistachios with the spices; some will end up pooled at the bottom of the bowl, which is fine.

Melt butter in a frying pan over medium heat, then whisk in honey. It will become bubbly and thick. Mix in spiced pistachios until fully coated and cook a few minutes. Grease a cookie pan lightly with cooking spray and spread the nut mixture into an even layer. Cook for about 5 minutes then remove from the oven. Some of the mixture will have melted off the nuts a bit; just retoss, it’s no big deal.) Let sit until fully cooled and set. Alternatively, if you’re in a rush (kind of like I was), then place the pan into the refrigerator for 10 minutes or the freezer, even, to allow the nuts to fully set. Use your fingers to break the pieces into individual nuts or small nut clusters; use a paper towel to blot them If they’re a bit greasy.

* * * * *

Candied Nuts | The TasteNuts still suffer from a bad reputation in some circles given they are what we nutrition people refer to as “energy dense.” In other words, they’re high in calories for the amount you’re eating. In about a 1/4 cup serving you’re going to get around 170 calories. That said, they’re very small, and if you take the time to shell them yourself you’ll feel more satiated since it gives your body a chance to say “Hey! I’m full!” (This is an important part of weight management, but I’ll not digress.) And pistachios are filled with heart-healthy unsaturated fats and minerals like copper, manganese, and phosphorous. They make a terrific afternoon snack, perfect with a piece of fruit.

Of course, there are even more delicious calories in candied nuts since they’ve got the added butter and sugar. Which is why I only make them for special occasions or cocktail parties and consume small portions—while enjoying, mindfully, every single last bite.

And I’m going to go ahead and say that you should, too.

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my cooking videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

Dr. P. K. NPK Newbyewby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. Her first book Foods for Health is onsale at local bookstores and here.

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

The Gift of Biscotti: Pretty, Mini, and Tied in Crimson

Dark chocolate biscotti is one of my favorite Christmas cookies. Click on the pic for the recipe.

When it comes to the holidays, I’m like anyone else, loving my annual cookie baking and eggnog making. Think: butter cookies in two flavors (cranberry pistachio and almond apricot), triple chocolate biscotti, and spicy-sweet gingersnaps. (These are just a small sampling of what’s here on my blog, with many more dishes to inspire here.)

Where I am perhaps a little different from others, however, is how I integrate seasonal treats into my diet. My Top Ten Healthy Holiday Eating Tips are here for you to consider, if you’re not familiar. One of my main strategies for managing calories when it comes to baking is “make it mini,” as I do with these biscotti. (The recipe and how-to are here.)

Another pointer, the subject of today’s post, is to enjoy the process but don’t keep the product—dozens and dozens of baked goods—hanging around your house for days on end. This will avoid unnecessary temptation, hence excess calories. (More on this subject here.) Thus, I, no doubt like many of you, love to share cookies with friends, family, and colleagues. Whether it’s bringing over a platter of assorted goodies to holiday gatherings or creating cute gift bags, giving is the way to go. It’s always fun to make presents in your own kitchen, and I especially enjoy introducing people to the wonder of baking with white whole wheat flour, like in this recipe. This game-changing ingredient is much more nutritious than refined flour and works especially well with big flavors like chocolate; you’ll never guess it’s there. (Read more here on “The Whole Grain Truth”.)

Hey, who ate the fourth biscotti?

With all that in mind, I decided to bake mini biscotti for my teaching staff and co-director for this year’s “Farm to Fork: Why What You Eat Matters” class at Harvard as a token of my gratitude. I made several bags with five small cookies, each tied with crimson ribbon. (Crimson for Christmas, not for Harvard, though it works for both.) Do note the number of cookies: with opportunities for indulgence at every turn, you don’t want to contribute to someone else’s weight gain in lieu of your own. And even if weight is not an issue, most people consume way too much sugar in their diet. As in all things food and life, go with quality, not quantity.

(Christmas tree not included.)

Now if only I could get the gift of biscotti out to each of you who took time out of your busy schedule to view this post… Thank you for reading, today and always, and Happy Holidays!

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my cooking videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more. 

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. 

© 2013 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Summertime Hydration, the P.K. Way

Everyone enjoys a cold drink on a hot summer’s day, whether to remain hydrated or just because it tastes good. However, when beverages come laden with sugar, either naturally occurring (as in 100% fruit juice) or added (like sports and fruit drinks, soda, teas, ades, and the like), our drinks become a source of extra calories that most of us don’t need.

And our bodies generally don’t want.

So I was all set to write a post about my favorite summertime beverage—which also happens to be sugar- and calorie-free—when I recalled I had already done so last year.

To learn what it is and read the story, click here.

Hint: I made it every day while on vacation last week.

And everyone always loves it, kids included.

Check it out.

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my cooking videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more. Thanks for reading!

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public healthShe brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time.

© 2013 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Asparagus for Breakfast? Yes, Please

You may recall that last week I wrote about lovely lemon-scented roasted asparagus, which I then paired with a piece of herb-roasted salmon and parship purée for dinner. I’m going to keep to my asparagus theme for a few more articles before turning to something new. This spring favorite only recently reached Boston, after all, so it deserves a bit more attention.

Today’s post features one of my favorite seasonal breakfasts and also serves as a reminder that these stately spears aren’t just for supper.

Indeed, most of us don’t consume nearly enough produce, and including vegetables in your breakfast is a super way to give your diet a boost of vitamins, minerals, and valuable phytonutrients (plant chemicals) your body needs for optimum health and disease prevention. Asparagus is particularly high in vitamin K and also contains vitamins B1and C and minerals such as iron and copper. Its key phytonutrients are saponins, which have been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. It’s also ridiculously low in energy with just 26 calories in one cup of raw stalks. Finally, most veggies tend to be high in water and fiber (asparagus in particular includes inulin) that help us feel full—something we want in our first meal of the day to keep us satiated throughout the morning.

There are certainly many ways to enjoy asparagus at breakfast. It can be a simple side dish, for starters, or can be included in egg dishes like benedicts, omelets, or frittatas. In fact, after posting a photo of this meal on Facebook last week a friend commented she had recently enjoyed a lobster, goat cheese, and asparagus omelet while dining out, which sounds heavenly. My dish is much simpler than that. Probably less tasty, too, but, hey, it was a Tuesday.

Simply roast some asparagus (or reheat leftovers from a previous evening’s dinner), fry an egg, season with salt and pepper, and you’re done. Fresh herbs or microgreens always add color, nutrients, and flavor: I used pretty micro peppercress—one of my local farmers grows it— but you can substitute chopped parsley or another plant of your choosing.

Eggs are a fantastic source of protein, which contributes to its satiety thus helps you eat less food and manage your weight. Its yolk in particular has lots of harder-to-come by nutrients like choline. We now know that moderate egg consumption doesn’t have a deleterious effect on blood cholesterol—many things are much worse, like trans fats—or increase risk of heart disease for most people, so enjoying eggs can be part of a healthful diet if you choose to consume them. (More here and here.) If you are able, selecting organic eggs that come from farmers who employ sustainable practices and treat their chickens humanely is a terrific way to support local businesses, the environment, and animal welfare.

You might be surprised at how filling this dish is and, while it may not be an everyday breakfast, it’s a great one to include in your “first meal of the day” repertoire when asparagus is in season. If you desire a few more calories or bite, or just feel like mixing it up a bit, throw the whole thing on a piece of whole grain toast for an open-faced egg sandwich; a touch of grated parmigiana and drizzle of olive oil adds even more flavor.

And, just for the record, this meal makes a great lunch, too.

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my cooking videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more. Thanks for reading!

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public healthShe brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. 

© 2013 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Dark Chocolate Chunk Cookies with Cherries and Walnuts

Thanks for indulging me these past few days with my cauliflower soup trifecta, including the basic (yet still fabulous) roasted and wonderful combinations including broccoli and artichokes. I actually have one more cauliflower-based soup to share, but I’ll hold off on that on for a few months.

Today, “c” stands not for cauliflower but for cookie. Here, we take everyone’s favorite, chocolate chip, and give it a nutrition boost by subbing in white whole wheat flour for white flour to retain the healthfulness of whole grains and using dark chocolate rather than milk or semi-sweet, which has less sugar and more of the bioactive components and antioxidants that are found in dark. That’s my normal recipe, by the way, when I just want a basic chocolate chip cookie. And by “my” recipe, I mean the famous Nestlé toll house recipe. I’ve made many other recipes over the years, of course, but I really do find this a solid chocolate chip cookie that never fails and is always delicious. I always add walnuts to my cookies, which are important not only for crunch but also texture, not to mention a few good omega-3 fatty acids; do what makes you happy. By the way, you’ll think I’m lying, but one day I made them with white flour—I had a craving but was out of whole wheat—and I truly did not like them nearly as much. The white whole wheat adds a texture and flavor that I really missed. I hope you’ll come to love it as much as I do.

When I want my cookie to be a little more classy, or just fee like mixing things up a bit, I add dried cherries and sub in pecans for the walnuts. (Note: while the nuts do not need to be toasted prior, I’ve found it brings in a bit more deliciousness if you do.)

My last few baking notes for you today? First, make it mini, of course, like all of my sweet treats. Also, don’t make a whole slew that you then have hanging around your house for days on end: at least for me, that kind of temptation leads to weight gain. It’s best to keep your house generally clean of energy-dense foods that pack on calories; eat cookies only as an occasional treat. (More on that subject at “To Clean Up Your Diet, Clean Out Your House.”) I only ever mix half a batch (for our household of two) and then keep extra balls of frozen dough in the freezer. That way, you have warm-from-the-oven chocolate chip cookies when you want them.

Just, you know, not every day.

 If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my cooking videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more. Thanks for reading!

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She is currently training for the Boston Marathon, her third (more here, and here). She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time.

© 2013 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

So this Broccoli Walks Into a Cauliflower…

Roasted Cauliflower Soup: It’s Just the Beginning

To share my love of cauliflower in all its forms, I promised there would be several variations of cauliflower soup.  Today’s recipe is the first example, and it’s dedicated to all of you out there who prefer the green crucifer to the white. This soup is just as delicious as basic cauliflower, but including broccoli in the mix is a little twist that adds style and lends a pretty light green hue. Both flavors come together beautifully in a creamy, heart-warming soup that’s perfect for cool spring days.

The steps are pretty much the same as described yesterday, so today I’m posting just a few brief notes and cooking photos.

1. Roast the cauliflower and broccoli (or follow the traditional boiling method). Note: You can use all parts of the vegetables in your soup, including the leaves and core. It tastes exactly the same, believe me, and reduces your food waste.

2. Do the same bit with the onions, celery, and seasonings then add in your stock and veggies and simmer away.

3. Purée and add cream if desired. Taste and season. Note: Don’t forget the dry mustard; it makes all the difference in the world. (And, no, the soup doesn’t then taste like mustard. Just: deliciousness.)

4. Garnish as desired, shown here with whole grain and flax seed croutons and a few scallions.

Mmmm mmmm good.

Way better than Campbell’s.

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my cooking videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She is currently training for the Boston Marathon, her third (more here, and here). She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. 

© 2013 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Divine Cauliflower Soup (Preferably Roasted)

I feel like I say “This is my favorite soup!” way too often. Of course, they can’t all be my favorites. That said, cauliflower soup really is a true favorite. This shouldn’t surprise you, given the unabashed affection I showed for roasted cauliflower, smashed cauliflower, and a few of its friends like aloo gobi and tri-color cauli salad.

(Regular readers, please forgive the redundancy. Long after you’ve read this post it goes into search engines, and those googlers know nothing of my cauliflower adoration and recent crucifer recipes.)

Today’s soup is simple to prepare, and it begins with roasted cauliflower. Now, if you’ve made cauliflower soup before, you might be familiar with the most common preparation, which basically boils the crap out of cauliflower along with the stock and onions, purées it up, and there you have it. Easy as pie. I made the soup this way for years following this method, and it’s solid. The idea for starting with roasted actually came from having leftover Sicilian salad.

And I’ve never looked back.

Cooking Instructions and Photos

1. Roast the cauliflower, as discussed here. Else begin with note 2.

2. Sauté chopped onions and celery in olive oil in a medium hot pan about 5-7 minutes, until soft; season with salt, black pepper, and thyme (fresh if you have it, else dried). Add several cloves of crushed garlic and stir until fragrant ~45 seconds. Add vegetable stock and roasted cauliflower (or raw if not using roasted).

3. Stir, bring up to a boil, then simmer ~20-25 minutes, until cauliflower is completely cooked and soft.

4. Purée soup. For a homogeneous soup, purée until smooth. For a more rustic soup, remove some of the cauliflower pieces before puréeing and add back at the end. For a thinner soup, add more stock. If desired, a bit of cream creates a velvety consistency that I like. A few tablespoons is all that is needed, as the soup is already beautifully thick, but a touch of cream is really lovely. Taste it before you add cream so you can decide what you prefer; it’s certainly not necessary if you prefer a vegan version.

5. Finish seasoning with a grind or two of fresh nutmeg and additional salt and black pepper. Additional seasonings I add that really make a difference are dry mustard and white pepper. Note that the flavor of this soup will vary depending on what stock you used and whether or not you roasted the cauliflower, so you may need to futz with the seasonings: the more flavors you started with, the less you’ll need to add at this step.

6. Garnish the soup however it makes you happy. I often use just chopped scallions and other times I take it up a notch with whole grain croutons, toasted breadcrumbs, or a touch of grated cheddar if I’m feeling the need for a heartier meal. (Remember, to me, this and a salad is dinner.)

In closing, let me just say that if you are new to cooking and/or have limited time or desire to roast the cauliflower, I’d still highly recommend this soup. It’s delicious and satisfying either way: I honestly did make it using just raw, boiled cauliflower for years and it was still one of my favorites.

But when it comes to getting the most flavor out of your veggies, you really just can’t beat roasting. And if you begin with your own stock, too? And then dress it up all pretty so it’s truly dinner worthy?

Yeah, baby. That’s what I’m talking about.

Definitely a favorite.

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my cooking videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She is currently training for the Boston Marathon, her third (more here, and here). She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. 

© 2013 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Soup’s On! Or, How to Make Vegetable Stock (Video)

In perusing my food porn over at Pinterest, I was shocked to see I had only nine pictures of soup. How is that possible, given I eat soup about twice a week? Fortunately, I have a slew of photos, recipes, and videos in my archive just waiting to be shared. I’ll therefore be taking time in the coming weeks to tantalize your taste buds with a few of my favorites. Think: Mexican vegetable, roasted cauliflower, Moroccan red lentil, minestrone, wild mushroom, and many more. (2014 Update: I’ve added many more since writing this post, so please check out my recipes page.)

Aside from the many creative ways to prepare soup and the fantastic health benefits—here’s the skinny on soup—I just really love it, whatever the weather. And what’s the common denominator for all my recipes? Why, homemade vegetable stock, of course. It’s the starting point for all my soups and is simple to make. It’s also a great way to put veggie scraps to good use and limit your food waste and packaging. Cheaper, too. (More on all that here.)

Here’s the how-to.

Cooking Note. I forgot to add bay leaves to this batch, which I did in my short video intro to stock here. No worries, though. Whereas you want to include the basics in each stock—onion, carrots, celery, peppercorns, and a slew of water—the herbs and other veggies you add can vary. It’s really not an exact thing.

Thanks for watching! I look forward to sharing more soup recipes and videos with you very soon.

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my cooking videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She is currently training for the Boston Marathon, her third (more here, and here). She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. 

© 2013 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Getting Creative: Modern Chopped Salad in Purple and Green

I mentioned last week that a crunchy chopped salad is a terrific way to add more veggies to your diet and a nice departure from the familiar lettuce-based salad. For more info on this topic, click here (for a winter version) or here (for a summer version) because this post is little more than a picture to provide further inspiration and share more chopped salad love.

Today’s story is simple, and not terribly uncommon: I had just returned from a trip and was craving my own vegetables and salads. My refrigerator, however, was frighteningly bare: all I could scrounge up was purple cabbage, red onion, parsley, and a jar of pimento-stuffed green olives. I also had some purple-speckled annelino beans I had procured from the local market while out of town (photo at the bottom of this post). Sound like an odd combination? I agree, and, yet, that’s what I had. But guess what? It was wonderful! And it’s really rather pretty with its various shades of purple and green.

Who knew purple cabbage would play together so nicely with olives and pole beans?

I have no idea whether this particular combination will appeal to you or not, but my point simply is that a chopped salad is a great way to bring together a few ingredients you like in a simple, healthful way. It’s also a fun opportunity to create something new and different each time you make it.

You just never know what will work.

 If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my cooking videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more. Thanks for reading!

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She is currently training for the Boston Marathon, her third (more here, and here). She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time.

© 2013 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Heirloom Italian curly annelino beans are gorgeous with their purple spots: Yet another fabulous discovery at the local farmers’ market.

Five-Minute Stovetop Oatmeal (Video)

Oatmeal with fresh blueberries and a touch of brown sugar is one of my favorite breakfasts.

This post is dedicated to my sister, who rolled her eyes following last year’s lobster bisque recipe, saying “No one’s ever going to make that!”

Okay, then. Tell me how you really feel. (I thought.)

“Seriously!”

No, really. Don’t hold back.

Yes, I do love to cook and occasionally write about elaborate meals that I and my foodie readers enjoy. Guilty. Make no mistake, though: peanut butter on toast, pasta and tomato sauce, big salads for supper, and hearty vegetarian soups play the starring roles in my diet, many of which are pretty simple to make. Really.

“Why don’t you do a post on oatmeal?” she continued.

Well, now that we’ve taken on a more constructive tone, that’s actually a great idea, since oatmeal is also a regular part of my diet and people probably don’t realize how easy it is to cook it at home—and it’s cheaper, healthier, and uses fewer natural resources than those little packets at the store. They’re okay in a pinch, very convenient, and more nutritious than a lot of other store-bought breakfast choices out there for sure, but it only takes five minutes to bring a bowl of hot, delicious oatmeal to your table.

And, despite commercials and cereal boxes that often picture mom feeding spoonfuls of some unrecognizable cereal into a toddler’s mouth, oatmeal is not just for babies or children. In fact, there’s a lot to be said for traditional “kid” foods that are great options for adults, too. (A peanut butter sandwich comes to mind.)

Check out the video for the how-to and learn why it’s so good for you.

So, yes, I find it perfectly acceptable that lobster bisque and oatmeal both appear happily on my blog. It’s all relative, though, my friends: I make lobster bisque about once a year, and I eat oatmeal around 3 times per week.

And if you had to choose only one to incorporate into your diet, definitely select oatmeal.

Whatever age you are.

 If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more. Thanks for reading and watching!

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She really does love her sister. She is currently training for the Boston Marathon, her third (more here, and here). She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time.

© 2013 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.