From Farm to Fork, Why What You Eat Matters: Foods for Health Now On Sale!

I am excited to announce that my first book is now on sale here and will be available in stores around the country on September 9, 2014!

Foods for Health

Foods for Health is science-based (of course!) and filled with great food porn—and even includes a few of my very own photos like the one here. It’s a gorgeous, coffee-table type book that highlights 148 foods and explains the health and environmental impacts of each in a user-friendly fashion. I can’t wait until my cookbooks are published to help you bring salubrious and sustainable eating to your plate in delectable ways. Until then, peruse hundreds of recipes right here on my blog and keep checking back with The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen for fabulous dishes that will make you swoon.

I hope you’ll understand that I won’t have much time to write in the upcoming weeks with the beginning of the semester and book tour activities. (By the way, you can still register for From Farm to Fork: Why What You Eat Matters if you like, and it’s offered online so you don’t need to be in Boston.) In the meanwhile, I hope you pick up a copy of Foods for Health for your collection. Thank you for your support!

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twitter, check out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. Her first book comes out on September 9, 2014.

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Heirloom Tomato, Mozzarella, and Pesto Sandwich: Summer on a Plate

Tomato and Mozzarella SandwichOkay, fine. Yes, I did also refer to my caprese salad with peaches as “summer on a plate.” I suppose it’s safe to say that almost everything I make these days is summer on a plate. Which means that seasonal delights like heirloom tomatoes and similar fare play a prominent role in my diet. Like Christmas for foodies (or something), summer tomatoes come but once a year—and I take full advantage.

Doesn’t mean you need to get all hot and bothered in the kitchen, though. (Unless you’re into that kind of thing, in which case I have plenty of splendid suggestions on my recipe page, including fresh tomato sauce.)

But if you’re like most people and prefer to keep things simple come August, this recipe is for you. Perfect for lunch, dinner, or a even a simple snack or hors d’oeuvre, the quintessential summer sandwich doesn’t get easier than slicing up a crusty baguette; spreading it with garlicky pesto (classic genovese or, for a change, parsley-pistachio); slabbing on tangy fresh mozzarella; and topping it with a thick slice of juicy tomato. Season with freshly cracked pepper and a bit of sea salt and tuck in a few leaves of basil here and there just for fun, perhaps an additional drizzle of olive oil. Pretty on the plate and a delight on the palate.

Sure, you can use a high-quality, store-bought pesto if you like. But why? if you’ve never made pesto from scratch before, now is the time. Fresh herbs abound at the local markets, sweet smelling and inexpensively priced. There’s a cooking video here to show you how, or a text version here; it takes all of five minutes. Go for it! As we like to say in New England, it’s wicked easy.

More importantly, it’s wicked delicious.

Heirloom Tomato and Pesto Sandwich

Since I’ve been blogging for the past three years, this may well be my shortest blog post ever. No reason to spend time reading about food, after all, or even writing about it. It’s summer! Get out there, enjoy it while it lasts, and savor the sweetness of the season by getting into the kitchen to bring summer onto your plate.

Looking for a title more tomato love? My other favorite sandwich features creamy garlic aioli and arugula. Or ditch the bread altogether and toss all the different colors of heirloom tomatoes you can find onto a plate for a pesto-laden caprese. More pesto-inspired ideas are here.

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twitter, check out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. Her first book comes out on September 9, 2014.

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Whole Grain Waffles with Blueberry Maple Syrup

Blueberry Waffle BiteI’ve made waffles all of two times in my life, including today. I don’t often do the sweet thing for breakfast but I am working hard this summer to expand my cooking skills. And who knows when a waffle need might suddenly arise, after all; best to be prepared.

Ergo this blog post, which I’m writing now lest I soon forget. Because, not to boast, but I’m pretty impressed with this dish. Especially since I had to futz to create a recipe for two and only two waffles to maintain healthy portion management in our two-person household. (That’s why a bunch of the ingredients specify “heaping,” by the way, because you need the right balance of wet and dry ingredients to achieve the right texture and I wasn’t up for writing a recipe with 5/8 of an egg.)

What a treat! My white whole wheat flour with all of its whole grain goodness yet soft texture delivers yet again.These waffles were even lighter and fluffier than I expected (see the photo?), with crisp outer edges and terrific flavor. While these little babies would be delightful with the standard maple syrup, my homemade blueberry syrup using sweet, local berries made an outstanding accompaniment.

* * * * *

Ingredients

  • Heaping 1/2 cup white whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 heaping teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 heaping teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 heaping teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon 2% milk
  • 3/4 cup blueberries
  • 1/4 cup pure maple syrup, or to taste
  • Pinch salt

Whisk together dry ingredients. Mix together beaten egg, melted butter, and milk and pour into dry mixture. Stir until the wet ingredients are incorporated, about 7-8 full strokes or so, and don’t over mix the batter; it’s okay if there are a few lumps. Let sit for 5 minutes while the waffle iron heats up. When hot, pour about 1/2 cup of batter onto the griddle, coming almost to the edges. Cook 3-5 minutes, until waffle is set and lightly browned. While the waffle is cooking, heat blueberries in a small saucepan over high heat until some begin to burst. Turn the heat down to medium and mash some of the blueberries to create a chunky sauce. Add the maple syrup and salt and stir to combine. Add a few more blueberries or a bit more maple syrup as desired to suit your taste. Makes 2 large round waffles. (I like splitting the pieces and serving as triangles; do as you wish.)

Waffles with Blueberry Maple Syrup

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I might have made waffles only twice in my life thus far, but I definitely see more waffles in my future.

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twitter, check out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. Her first book comes out on September 9, 2014.

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Summer on a Plate: Caprese, Meet Peaches

It doesn’t get much prettier or simpler than this. In a feast for the eyes as well as the palate, this ravishing play on caprese salad screams summer with the addition of juicy peaches. The traditional ingredients of tomato, mozzarella, and basil still shine, but including sweet stone fruit brings a burst of color and flavor that just may make you swoon.

Caprese Salad wiht Peaches

Simply slice your favorite tomato—heirlooms are glorious, if you can find them—and serve with peach wedges and shards of fresh mozzarella. I had a bit of extra basil oil, which is why the cheese has flecks of green, but you needn’t bother. (Though the addition of pesto is always an option on this kind of salad, as shown here.) Tuck in a few leaves of basil and season with flaky salt and freshly ground pepper; a drizzle of balsamic is always delicious, too, pictured below.

Caprese Salad wiht Peaches and Balsamic

Okay, fine, yes, I just wanted to include another photo of this salad because it’s so luscious.

And I really have very little else to say, other than to encourage you to take advantage of local and seasonal produce while you can. The tomatoes, peaches, and basil came from my local farmers’ market, which makes all the difference when it comes to taste. You can have fun with the salad by mixing up the variety and color of the tomatoes, the type of cheese, and even the herbs and stone fruit you use: make it delicious, your way.

And do make it soon.

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. Her first book comes out on September 9, 2014.

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Blueberry Ginger Scones: Simply Scrumptious

Blueberry Ginger SconeI’m always sad when strawberry season ends. Happily, the berry love keeps coming when other delightful summer berries next appear at my local farmers’ market. Enter the blueberry, that little fruit which packs a big nutritional punch due to its incredibly high antioxidant capacity thanks in part to anthocyanins. Anthocyanins are powerful phytonutrients (plant chemicals) found mainly in the skins and give blueberries their romantic dusky hue.

Blueberries are my favorite berry to munch on right out of the carton or throw on cold breakfast cereal or oatmeal. They also make starring appearances in muffins of the corn or bran persuasion, not to mention pancakes. Blueberries bring beauty and flavor to salads, too, like in my arugula salad with quinoa, blueberries, and Marcona almonds.

In today’s recipe (obviously filed under the “moderation” chapter of Cooking and Eating the P.K. Way), I fold blueberries into scones alongside candied ginger. And, to be clear, the ginger is just as important to this glorious pastry as are the blueberries. Together, the winning combination of sweet blueberries and slightly spicy ginger comes together in one of the tastiest scones I’ve ever eaten.

Don’t believe me? Just try it yourself.

* * * * *

Blueberry Ginger SconesIngredients

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold, diced
  • 1/2 cup fresh blueberries
  • 2 tablespoons candied ginger, chopped
  • 1/2 cup + 1 teaspoon heavy cream, separated
  • 1 teaspoon Demerara or other sugar (optional)

Instructions
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Whisk together dry ingredients. Add diced butter into the mixture and combine using a fork or pastry knife until the butter is the size of small peas. Fold in blueberries and ginger to coat with the flour mixture. Add cream and stir with a fork just until flour is fully incorporated. The dough will be sticky. Lightly flour your hands and gather it together into a ball, then shape it into a disc about 1 inch tall and 6 inches wide on a floured surface. Use a pastry brush to lightly glaze the dough with the remaining 1 teaspoon of cream and sprinkle lightly with sugar, if desired. Use a sharp knife to cut the dough into 4 pieces. Place on an ungreased cookie sheet an inch apart and bake 15-20 minutes, until risen and lightly browned. Let cool approximately 10 minutes before eating.

Makes 4 large scones. (Had I fully realized how large they were I would have probably cut my disc into 5 or 6.)

* * * * *

It had been ages since I’ve made scones, and I can’t tell you how thrilled I was with outcome. This recipe is a “cream” scone, as you glean from the egg-less ingredients. Because of that, the texture is incredibly rich and tender, more cake-y than bread-like. While no one would argue that a fresh blueberry scone all on its own isn’t delicious, the addition of candied ginger took these scones to a whole new level of greatness. You can use crystallized if you prefer, though candied tends to be a bit softer and works especially well in baked goods (like in my ginger snaps).Blueberry Scone Plated

There was another reason I made this particular recipe, too. You see, if you follow my blog you know that I am in love with white whole wheat flour, a whole grain counterpart to refined flour that provides a softer texture than traditional whole wheat flour but with the same health benefits. I’ve used it in all kinds of baked goods with excellent results, like brownies, chocolate zucchini breadpumpkin bread, and biscotti. This recipe begged me for white whole wheat flour and would doubtless yield a wonderful scone. However, I decided to conduct a little experiment here with you to examine the question directly: Is a scone made with white whole wheat flour truly as good as its refined grain counterpart?

We shall see, my friends. We shall see. Stay tuned for later this summer when I remake these scones and share the results.

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. Her first book comes out on September 9, 2014.

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Za’atar: The Beginning of Something Beautiful

Za'atarDid you know that za’atar actually refers to Origanum syriacum, a perennial plant indigenous to the Middle East? 

Yeah. Me, neither.

Today, za’atar generally includes a selection of herbs from the genera Origanum, Calamintha, Thymus vulgaris, and Satureja (otherwise known as oregano, basil thyme, thyme, and savory). But when most people hear the word “za’atar,” they are thinking about the tantalizing Middle Eastern spice blend that creates a party on your palate and livens up all kinds of dishes. A typical recipe calls for herbs, sesame seeds, salt, and sumac, though most cooks have their own go-to variation. I use fresh thyme, since I adore it, and include both black and white sesame seeds for added color and flavor. Sumac is a required ingredient that provides subtle flecks of red and distinctive flavor to the mixture; you can probably find it at your supermarket. The black and cayenne pepper are my own touch, since I like a bit of heat; omit one or both if you don’t. It’s your za’atar, after all.

However you do it, make it. Make it now.

* * * * *

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon white sesame seeds, toasted
  • 1 tablespoon black sesame seeds, toasted
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground sumac
  • 1/2 teaspoon coarse salt
  • Couple of grinds of black pepper
  • Pinch cayenne

Toast the sesame seeds in a pan over medium-high heat about 5 minutes, until fragrant and deepened in color. While that’s happening, remove the thyme from its stems and mince roughly. (You want 2 tablespoons total once it’s minced.) After the seeds have cooled for a few minutes, mix all ingredients together in a bowl. Store unused za’atar in the refrigerator.

* * * * *

Za’atar can be used in ways limited only by your imagination. Simple uses include sprinkling it over olive oil to make a tasty dip for (pita) bread or scattering it on hummus for extra zing. That’s simply the beginning, though, so if you need help envisioning its many uses, search the interwebs or click here—and make sure to come back to The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen to see what I conjure in the not-too-distant future.

Za'atar and Pita

Thanks for reading!

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. Her first book comes out on September 9, 2014.

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Artichoke Hummus: Super Easy, and Ready in Five Minutes

Artichoke HummusAh, hummus. Never really cared for it, truth be told. Like so many store-bought products, the flavor and quality varies greatly. (That’s my polite way of saying that it often sucks.) There are exceptions to this rule, like a particular brand at Trader Joe’s that I’ve been calling “crack hummus” because if it’s on hand, I can’t get enough.

That said, hummus is so easy to make at home, and I’ve come to prefer the fresher flavor and less homogeneous texture of my own recipe. I love beginning with dried beans—they’re not just for kindergarten art projects, you know—though my desire to eat hummus doesn’t always coincide with the extra time needed to start completely from scratch. Fortunately, both chick peas (garbanzo beans) and artichokes are handily found on the supermarket shelves, making this version of hummus even quicker to whip up at home. And I’m talking about five minutes here, folks, so grab yourself a no-salt added can of each and a few kitchen staples and let’s get cooking.

* * * * *

Ingredients

  • 2 cups chick peas, drained (save liquid)
  • 2 cups artichoke hearts, drained (save liquid)
  • 4-5 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 1 tablespoon tahini
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/3 cup water
  • Juice from 1/4 lemon, freshly squeezed
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions

For more information on how to make hummus, you can watch this five-minute video. Basically, all you need to do is put everything together in the food processor, taste, and adjust the seasoning to suit your palate. Note that for the liquid you can use either the artichoke water or garbanzo liquid from the cans, assuming there was no salt added, or just use water. Start with the lower amounts of ingredients in the recipe and go from there; I often find myself adding a bit more lemon juice or water and an extra drizzle or two of olive oil.

* * * * *

Note that while this hummus can be eaten immediately, the garlicky flavor that I adore really comes out once it’s hung out in the fridge for a while. Then it’s even better. Drizzle with a bit of olive oil and give it a crack of pepper and serve with your favorite veggies for a scrumptious treat you can feel good about. And if you like this recipe, be sure to check out my other favorite kind of hummus, roasted red pepper. Either makes a fabulous sandwich, too.

Thanks for reading, and enjoy!

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. Her first book comes out on September 9, 2014.

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

For the Love of Strawberries: P.K.’s Recipe Round-Up

Strawberry Cartons

Just as the weather is heating up on the East Coast, so, too is the local bounty. Things start slowly here in New England but we’re finally seeing some serious vegetables and fruits at our farmers’ markets. And there’s no happier day for me than when strawberries appear on the stands. I adore summer strawberries and love to feature them on salads and in cocktails—and making strawberry ice cream (or gelato) is an annual tradition that simply must happen. Forget about the hard and flavorless pink variant you find off-season; you simply can’t beat a local summer strawberry, juicy and sweet. Check out the photos and find the links to the recipes at the bottom of the page.

Sure, strawberries are low in calories at only 46 calories per cup. And they’re a vitamin C powerhouse; rich in fiber and manganese; and loaded in phytonutrients (plant chemicals) like anthyocyanins and phenolic acids that have been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. Good stuff, sure, but I eat them because they’re awesome.

Or drink them, as the case may be.

Enjoy the sweet taste of summer!

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more. Thanks for reading!

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time. 

Strawberry Cartons

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Sizzling Fish Fajitas with Mango Salsa: Colorful and Delicious

Welcome! I’m currently working on my second book and getting ready for my upcoming book tour for National Geographic’s Foods for Health. For more frequent updates on Cooking and Eating the P.K. Way, please become a fan on Facebook. And don’t forget to peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more!

Fish Fajitas with Mango SalsaDespite the long list of things I need to write (don’t even get me started), I often end up blogging about impromptu weeknight meals inspired by fresh seasonal ingredients—or whatever’s hanging around my fridge. In this instance, I had some leftover mango salsa from last week’s crab cakes (speaking of things on the list of “need to write”) that I wanted to feature in a different dish.

Mango salsa is sensational with soft lobster tacos or atop a simple piece of seared fish, but it had been some time since I’d made fajitas. Enter today’s dinner: sizzling fish fajitas with mango salsa, an amazing combination of meaty tilapia and the traditional mélange of peppers and onions stuffed into a warm whole wheat tortilla with sliced avocado.

Because I’ve written about fajitas before, today’s post is mainly cooking photos. Fajitas are easy to make, since you mainly sauté vegetables and whatever protein you’re using, but the marinade is the key ingredient that imparts the flavor you expect from this Mexican favorite; click here for more details. One of my Facebook fans claims this is one of her go-to recipes of mine. I hope you enjoy this dish as much as she does!

* * * * *

Fish Fajitas Ingredients

Marinate veggies and fish for about 30-45 minutes, tossing every 10 minutes or so.

Mango Salsa and Avocado

While the veggies are marinating, mix your salsa and slice some avocado.

Sizzling Fish Fajitas

Sauté the veggies first, then remove and do the fish in the same pan. (Fish cooks more quickly.) Next time I’ll keep the fish whole and cut into strips afterward, since many of the pieces flaked off during cooking. Still delicious, though.

Fish Fajitas

Serve fajita mixture on a large platter, allowing people to stuff and garnish as desired. (Chopped cilantro and soft tortillas not pictured.)

* * * * *

Tilapia is terrific, budget-friendly, and sure to please kids and “I don’t like fish” adults alike because it is mildly flavored and looks and tastes almost like—you guessed it—chicken. It is, in fact, known in the food industry as “aquatic chicken.” Perhaps that’s why it is the fourth most consumed fish in the US, according to the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Tilapia farmed in the US is ranked as a “best choice” when it comes to the environment especially when grown in closed recirculating systems.

Think all “farmed fish” are bad? Think again. The sustainability of fish populations and the environmental impact of seafood consumption are related to a wide variety of factors, and wild-caught fish—including local species—have their own set of problems; ecologically sound aquaculture is likely part of the solution to feeding a growing population, as discussed in this brief Worldwatch Institute report and this video. Tilapia does not have the same health benefits as fattier fish, which have far more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids, but it is a lean protein low in calories with a smaller carbon footprint than terrestrial foods like poultry, beef, and lamb.

Of course, this meal could be easily reproduced using tofu or your favorite meat substitute, which would also be splendid. After all, the entire inspiration for this post was the salsa! But this particular combination of tilapia, onions, and peppers worked wonderfully, so give it a shot. Even if you think you don’t like fish.

Fajita Close-up

And enjoy!

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time.

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.

Summer Cocktails Starring Local Fruits, Vegetables, and Herbs (Slide Show)

Strawberry Bourbon Lemonade A lot of articles on cocktails have been flitting across my newsfeed as we approach the first weekend of summer. The New York Times did a recent round up of their favorites, and even helps you create your own to suit your mood and occasion. (No choice of bourbon in their pull-down list, however—a definite oversight in my view.)

By this point in my food writing career I’ve shaken up a goodly number of luscious libations myself over the years based on fresh seasonal ingredients from my local farmers’ market. I pull them all together in today’s slide show for your viewing pleasure and drinking inspiration. From berries to herbs, vodka to tequila, I hope you find something here that you like; there’s even a non-alcoholic mocktail in there, too. The links to the drinks are at the bottom of the post, where you can find the recipe and learn the story behind each cocktail’s creation.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Here’s to a wonderful summer 2014!

And cheers to you—thanks for reading!

If you like what you see here at The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen, please subscribe to my blog from the home page, become a fan on Facebook, follow me on Twittercheck out my food porn on Pinterest, watch my videos on YouTube, and peruse my recipe page for soups, salads, seafood, sweets, and more.

P.K. NewbyDr. P. K. Newby is a nutrition scientist and educator with expertise in the prevention of obesity and chronic diseases through diet and the relations between agriculture, food production, and public health. She brings together her passions for food, cooking, science, and sustainability through her writing and videos to help people eat their way towards better health, one delectable bite at a time.

© 2014 The Nutrition Doctor is In the Kitchen. All Rights Reserved.